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Novel and vivacious

G. SWAMINATHAN

The Krishnakumars' kalpanaswaras came through fresh and bright; Chandrasekaran presented a concert absolutely classic.

Photos: K.N.Muralidharan.

IN UNISON: Krishnakumar and Binny

Singing siblings are aplenty; but singing couples are rare, especially in Carnatic music. Trivandrum Krishnakumar and Binny Krishnakumar have been performing together for sometime. When male and female voices combine, it is a challenge to maintain sruti alignment and indulge in manodharma. With time and effort, the Krishnakumars have learnt to tackle these issues And their concert for Bhairavi Gana Sabha stood out for novelty and vivacity. The sharp soprano notes of Binny at times eclipsed the soft and smooth voice of Krishankumar. There were slight unavoidable clashes of creativity between the two. Probably, these add spice and make the concert colourful.

Since there was not enough time (it was a 60-minute affair) for any slow and steady warm up, their swift start of `Vara Narada Narayana' in Vijayashri set the pace for the concert. The surfeit of sangatis and the well-linked kalpanaswaras that alternated between the duo came through fresh and bright.

`Nada Murali Gana Vilola' in Hamirkalyani came at a alilting tempo. Binny delineated Kapi raga as the main piece, with remarkable vocal articulation and improvisation.

Each phrase covered all the three registers and Krishnakumar's creativity was supplemented by Binny's subtle and aesthetic ornamentation and vice versa.



M. Chandrasekaran.

The differing notes on the ascent and descent of Kapi and its complex beauty opened the floodgates for this creative couple to explore the melody, range and nuances of the raga. `Inta Sowkya' of Tyagaraja came in all its strength, amply appended with kalpanaswaras focused on `ri ni sa' with a variety of computation.

`Isayin Perumayai,' a Tamil composition in Kuntalavarali and `Japatha Japtha Hari Nama' in Sindhubhairavi brought the curtain down. Srinivasa Rao on the violin, Prapancham Ravindran on the mridangam and teenager Prapancham Shailendra on the kanjira boosted the concert with their dashing support.

Choicest numbers

One should appreciate the spirit and not the sound of violin maestro M. Chandrasekaran's vocal recital. Notwithstanding the tricks played by his vocal chords, Chandrasekaran put forth a concert of verve and camaraderie.

The meticulous announcements with the choicest forgotten numbers like `Arul Purivai Karunai Kadale' in Hamsadhwani and the main `Yaro Ivar Yaro' in Bhairavi were worth listening in Chandrasekaran's classical style.

Earlier, Chandrasekaran entertained the audience with his own varnam in Shanmugapriya, `Ramabhirama' in Darbar and `Divakara Thanujam' in Yadukulakhambodi.

With the veteran vocalist showering expressions like `bale bale' and `besh' on the accompanying artists Madurai Balasubramaniam (violin) and Umayalpuram Mali (mridangam), one has little to comment on their cooperation.

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